When you rent a house you have a lot of rights. KCLS lawyers can help you if your rights are being ignored or breached by your landlord.

What are your rights when you rent a house?

  • To have a safe and secure house;
  • To have any maintenance completed quickly;
  • Not to have to pay for damage that is 'fair wear and tear'; and
  • To use and enjoy your house.

These rights are found in the Residential Tenancies Act 1984 (WA).

If you think your rights have been breached, you can ask us for legal advice.

What are your responsibilities when you rent a house?

  • Pay your rent on time: the most basic obligation when you rent a house is to pay your rent on time;
  • Pay your debts;
  • Keep your house clean and tidy;
  • Be a good neighbour: although you have a right to enjoy your house, your neighbours also have a right to enjoy theirs. Try to avoid making lots of noise at your house.

If you don't pay your rent or other bills and you make lots of noise at your house, your landlord may try and kick you out.

Most of the time you can't be kicked out of your house unless you agree to leave, or there is a Court order evicting you from the house.

You should ask for legal advice before you agree to leave your house. KCLS might be able to give you legal advice and represent you in court if you are at risk of being kicked out of your home.

Do you rent from Department of Housing or Community Housing?

There are special rules that apply to social housing providers, including Department of Housing and Community Housing, around:

  • how rent gets calculated; and
  • how you might be kicked out.

You should ask for legal advice before you agree to leave your house. KCLS might be able to give you legal advice and represent you in court if you are at risk of being kicked out.

What else can we help with?

  • Making an application for social housing and explaining the 'priority list' and the 'wait turn list';
  • Making an application to transfer between social housing providers;
  • Understanding your Tenancy Agreement before you sign up;
  • Appealing charges on your account that you don't agree with;
  • Dealing with complaints from your neighbours;
  • Giving up your house: there are lots of ways that tenancies can end; and
  • Getting your bond back.

Case study: Maryanne

Maryanne rents a house from the Department of Housing. She has had a lot of complaints about noise coming from her house and police often attend. 

Maryanne received a letter from the court which said that the Department of Housing was trying to evict her because of all the noise. Maryanne contacted KCLS and said that her abusive ex-partner keeps coming to the house at night and waking up the neighbours.

KCLS can help Maryanne with court and negotiate with the Department of Housing, so that Maryanne might keep her house.

 

Want our help?

Call us for free on 1800 686 020. You can get more information on how to contact KCLS here:

You can contact KCLS by phone to arrange to talk to our staff when they visit your community. KCLS is happy to be invited to talk with groups and at meetings.